Ben Tee

Tuesday, 11 December 2012

9.7 km/829 m/04:45 hrs

Corbett: Ben Tee (No. 39)

This was my second attempt at Ben Tee, a few years ago strong winds had stopped me shortly before the summit. It had been impossible to stand upright and after sitting down and holding on to a rock for a while to prevent me from being blown over, I had decided to give up and come back another time.

Today was supposed to be a nice day, but when I started walking from Kilfinnan, the views were not very promising.

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Thankfully, when I reached the wide plateau above the gorge of the Kilfinnan Burn, I was above the cloud level.

Meall nan Dearcag.

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Stile, with Ben Tee just emerging from the cloud.

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Ben Tee.

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The terrain on the plateau which had been very boggy the last time, was mainly frozen and much easier to walk on, but there were still some softer patches in between where I broke through the surface and ended up ankle-deep in the mud.

Snow-capped Meall Fuar-mhonaidh in the distance above Loch Ness.

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Inversion over Loch Lochy and Loch Oich.

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Sròn a’ Choire Ghairbh.

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On Ben Tee’s E ridge.

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Ben Tee – a volcano?? 😆

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Clouds creeping from the Great Glen onto Glengarry Forest.

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The Monadhliaths.

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Approaching the first of several false summits – although the terrain steepens at this point, I didn’t need MicroSpikes because the snow was soft and I could easily kick steps or follow other walkers’ footprints.

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When I reached the top of the ridge, the stunning views from the W to the N opened up.

The Glen Shiel Munros.

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View W along Glen Kingie.

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It was nice and warm in the sun, and I had a long lunch break by the summit cairn with tea and cake.

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Sròn a’ Choire Ghairbh, with Ben Nevis on the skyline behind.

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Beinn Loinne, with the North Glen Shiel Munros in the distance.

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View towards Knoydart, the pointy top of Sgurr na Ciche in the centre.

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The clouds were still lying over Loch Lochy when I returned the same way. I felt a bit sorry for everyone driving along the A82 who didn’t know what views they had been missing…

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A zoomed view of Ben Nevis on the last part of the descent to Kilfinnan.

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11 thoughts on “Ben Tee

  1. Wow, what fabulous views there are from Ben Tee, especially towards Glen Shiel ! I’ve still got to do this hill so will definitely save it for a clear day. You were lucky that the cloud stayed low !
    keithpostie

    • At the start I was a bit worried I would have to walk in the clouds all day, but thankfully it was an inversion. I was also pleasantly surprised about the views, and the air was exceptionally clear – you probably only get that on a winter’s day!

    • I don’t really walk a lot in winter, but as I prefer to walk in nice weather conditions I try to plan my walks accordingly. Luckily, I work shifts (four days on, four days off) which offers a lot of opportunities to get out when the weather is good 🙂

      • I work shifts too – not such a regular pattern but we get a full week off every 28 days 🙂 It’s easier if you live up there to choose your weather really – I always feel that, after I’ve driven up from England, I have to still do the walks I’d planned whatever the weather, otherwise it’s wasting money.

      • I know that feeling, even living up here I often have to remind myself that the hills are not going anywhere and that I should just come back another time instead of going up in terrible weather. With the cost of petrol etc. I also tend to regard it as a waste of money (and time) to just drive home again…

      • Well, not only that but, the hills might not be going anywhere but we might not always be able to do them. I found that out the other year when I broke my wrist first and then, the day I had my pot off, broke my big toe the same day. The wrist was only 8 weeks but the big toe was a nightmare and kept me off the hills for the rest of the year (I broke it in June). I started to wonder whether I’d ever be able to go up a hill again!

      • Sorry to hear that and I hope you have fully recovered now? Thankfully I haven’t broken any bones yet *knock on wood*, but I’ve sometimes got trouble with my ankles and knees, and I know these things will probably become worse the older I get 😦 The best thing is to do everything we want to do now and not leave it till sometime later in life, I suppose…

      • I’ve broken loads of bones – the wrist was really weird as I’d just come back from the Cuillin and been fine and then slipped on a muddy banking walking to work a day after I’d got back. No one could believe it! My toe was even stupider as I broke it in the house walking round without slippers.

        I can’t say I’m walking perfectly and have had a few problems since my toe but I’ll manage. I think it’s more determination than anything else isn’t it 😉

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